2013 City Council Redistricting

Adopted December 10, 2013

Date Posted: December 8th, 2021 @ 11:28 PM
Last Updated: December 8th, 2021 @ 11:32 PM

Update: In September, 2014, the City's Redistricting consultant produced a demographics table showing data from each City Council and OUSD electoral district (such as household income, number of households, age of residents, rentals/ownership, and voter registration and participation). To see the table, click here.

Update: In April 2014, a video on Council District changes was produced. Click here to view the video.

Click here to see the adopted map as a high-resolution PDF

Update: In early February 2014, an informational brochure on Council District boundary changes will be mailed to affected households.

The brochure is just one element of an outreach campaign to educate Oakland residents about the boundary changes that resulted from the 2013 Redistricting process.

Update: On December 10, 2013, the City Council adopted the ordinance creating the 2013-2023 Council and OUSD electoral district boundaries.

The City's online Council District Locator Tool is being updated and should reflect the 2013-2023 District Boundaries on Friday, December 20. Click here to use the City's Council District Locator Tool.

To educate those residents impacted by changes to district boundaries, the City of Oakland will undertake an outreach campaign beginning in January. In addition to the use of Web and Social Media outlets, the campaign will include a direct mail piece to impacted residents, presentations to Neighborhood Crime Prevention Councils in areas where the boundaries shifted and informational slides on the City’s television station, KTOP TV-10. Printed information will be available in English, Chinese, Spanish and Vietnamese.

The City of Oakland's City Charter requires redistricting every 10 years to adjust Council District boundaries to reflect population changes over the last 10 years. The goal of redistricting is to make the population in each district as equal as possible, following Federal, state and local law.

Specifically, the City Charter Section 203 states, “In the year 1993, and every ten years thereafter, and whenever any substantial territory is annexed to or consolidated with the City, the Council shall form new districts not exceeding seven. Districts shall be composed of contiguous territory, as equal as possible in population, and as geographically compact as practicable.”

In 2003, City Council District boundaries were revised through Council adoption of Ordinance No. 12495 C.M.S. Click here to view the Ordinance. Not sure which Council District you reside in currently? Click here to see the 2003 Council District boundaries in Google Maps.

The 2010 U.S. Census indicated that population changes between 2000 and 2010 have made some Oakland Council districts higher or lower in population than the citywide average population per council district, which is 55,818 people per district. This number is referred to as the Mean District Population.

Council District Population and Difference from Mean District Population
before and after Redistricting using 2010 Census data
Council
District
Population before 2013 Redistricting% Difference
from Mean before Redistricting
Population after 2013 Redistricting% Difference
from Mean after Redistricting
158,4244.7%57,2212.51%
251,667-7.4%57,1022.30%
362,51012.0%57,1962.47%
455,618-0.4%54,662-2.07%
552,813-5.4%54,681-2.04%
654,412-2.5%54,582-2.21%
755,280-1.0%55,280-0.96%

In redistricting it's important to keep certain legal requirements and criteria in mind. The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution mandates “one person, one vote.” For the purpose of the Council redistricting, this means that the seven Oakland Council districts need to contain a nearly equal number of inhabitants. Courts have held that deviations may be allowed in certain situations:

  • To make districts compact and contiguous
  • To protect incumbents in a non-partisan and non-discriminatory manner
  • To preserve discrete local political boundaries
  • To maintain the cores of prior districts
  • To recognize communities of interest

The considerations and policy supporting population deviations must be applied consistently throughout all seven Council districts, free from any arbitrariness or discrimination, and free from bias towards any particular political interest or geographic area. The City's redistricting efforts strove to balance populations in Council Districts, while taking into consideration the above factors.

Criteria for the 2013 redistricting were part of the City Council discussion at its meeting on June 4. Click here to read the staff report and adopted resolution which established the criteria.

Redistricting Project Schedule

The schedule for the 2013 Council Redistricting began in May, with the fully executed contract with National Demographics Corporation. The new council district boundaries were adopted on Tuesday, December 10.

On June 4, 2013, the City Council adopted a schedule of public workshops/town hall meetings so that Oaklanders could participate in the Redistricting process. One workshop was held in each of the seven Council districts; all residents, regardless of where they live in the City of Oakland, and all interested parties were welcomed to attend any and all of the public redistricting workshops. Interpreters and translation services were offered upon request.

Redistricting Public Meeting Schedule
(adopted by City Council on June 4)
Date and TimeType of Meeting/HearingLocation
Tuesday, June 4City Council Meeting on redistricting schedule and criteriaCouncil Chambers, Oakland City Hall
Wednesday, July 10,
6 - 8 pm
Public Workshop/Forum81st Avenue Branch Library, 1021 81st Ave.
Thursday, July 11,
6:30 - 8:30 pm
Public Workshop/Forum

Council Chambers, Oakland City Hall, 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza
Meeting will be re-broadcast on KTOP (TV-10) on July 18, at 5:30 pm;

Click here to watch the video of the Redistricting Meeting on July 11.

Saturday, July 13,
10 am - Noon
Public Workshop/ForumDimond Recreation Center, 3860 Hanly Rd.
Friday, August 16,
5 pm
Initial Deadline for Plan Submissions by the PublicDate extended to August 16, 2013.
Thursday, September 5,
6:30 -8:30 pm
Public Workshop/Forum

Cesar Chavez Education Center, (Cafeteria), 2825 International Blvd.

Click here to listen to the audio file of this workshop.

Saturday, September 7,
10 am - Noon
Public Workshop/Forum

Frick Middle School, 2845 64th Ave.

Click here to listen to the audio file of this workshop.

Saturday, September 7,
2 - 4 pm
Public Workshop/Forum

Oakland Public Library, Main Branch Auditorium, 125 14th St.

Click here to listen to the audio file of this workshop.

Sunday, September 8,
3 - 5pm
Public Workshop/Forum

Claremont Middle School, 5750 College Ave.

Click here to listen to the audio file of this workshop.

Thursday, October 3,
10:15 am
Rules and Legislation Committee Meeting

Council Chambers, Oakland City Hall

Click here to read Agenda Report and Supplemental Report (9.27.13).

Click here to view the KTOP video broadcast of the hearing. (Redistricting discussion begins starting at 1 hour, 9 minutes and 28 seconds into this broadcast).

Tuesday, October 15,
6:30 pm
Council Hearing on Plan Selection - Review of District Alternatives

Council Chambers, Oakland City Hall, 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza

Click here to read Agenda Report and Supplemental Reports, including Supplemental Report #4, which introduces consultant maps #17 and 18, as well as a publically-submitted map, #19.

Click here to watch the KTOP video broadcast of the Council hearing (item begins 2 hours, 11 minutes and 40 seconds into the broadcast).

Tuesday, October 29,
6:00 pm
The Council voted at this hearing to adopt Map #26 as the 2013 City Council and OUSD boundaries.

Council Chambers, Oakland City Hall, 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza

Click here to view the KTOP video broadcast of the Council hearing (item begins 35 minutes and 46 seconds into the broadcast).

Click here to view the supplemental report (#5) which includes Maps #23, 24, and 25. Supplemental reports #6, 7 and 8 are Councilmember-proposed maps, which can also be viewed in the "Proposed Maps" section of the website, below.

Tuesday, November 19,
6:30 pm
Update: Council voted 7-0 at the first reading of the ordinance to adopt Map #26 as the 2013 City Council and OUSD boundaries. Second reading and adoption of the boundaries in Map #26 will be considered at the Council hearing on December 10th.

Council Chambers, Oakland City Hall, 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza

Click here to open a presentation which shows details of each neighborhood changed under the 2013 Redistricting map.

Click here to view the KTOP video broadcast of the Council hearing. (Redistricting item begins at 4 hours, 7 minutes and 30 seconds).

Click here to read the Agenda report and the ordinance for the 2013 Redistricting.

Tuesday, December 10,

6:30 pm

Council hearing for second reading and final adoption of the 2013 Redistricting Ordinance, introduced on November 19, 2013.Council Chambers, Oakland City Hall, 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza


The goal of the first round of workshops/forums in July was to:

  • Let people know why redistricting is occurring and what it involves
  • Allow attendees to share their views and suggestions
  • Inform attendees on how to participate in the process as it moves forward
  • Introduce the resources available to residents interested in participating (e.g. Maptitude software)

At each workshop/forum, a map of current districts was posted with streets, neighborhood labels, existing district lines and existing district population deviations. Participants were given a handout with the redistricting schedule and a general comment card with small map of existing districts. Handouts were translated into Spanish, Chinese and Vietnamese. Simultaneous translation was available at the meetings upon request.

Click here to view the PowerPoint presentation from the July 2013 Redistricting Town Hall Meetings.

Click here for Spanish translation. Click here for Chinese translation.

The goal for the second round of workshops/forums in September was to:

  • Remind people why redistricting is occurring and what it involves
  • Share any draft and submitted redistricting plans that have been drawn to date
  • Encourage attendees to share their views about the process and the plans
  • Inform attendees on how to participate in the process as it moves forward
  • Introduce the resources available to residents interested in participating

At each September workshop/forum, participants were given maps of all draft and submitted redistricting plans and asked to comment about what is good and bad about each respective plan and to check a box if they find the plan recommended, acceptable or unacceptable.

Click here for the PowerPoint presentation from the September 2013 Redistricting Town Hall meetings. (16MB PDF document)

Reports, Documents and Presentations

  1. Data from City of Oakland American Community Survey 2007-2011 (Excel Spreadsheet)
  2. Map of Oakland households with children living at home
  3. Map of Oakland households with college graduates
  4. Map of Oakland households with income under $50,000 per year
  5. Map of Oakland households who rent their homes
  6. Map of Oakland households who live in single-family homes
  7. Map of Oakland households who speak English at home

Proposed Redistricting Maps

Proposed redistricting maps from the workshops/forums, from the online mapping engagement tool (see below), from the City's redistricting consultant, or from the Councilmembers were posted here as they were received. Click the links to leave the City's website, and view the in Google Maps, without login. To comment publicly on these maps, use the "Engage Oakland" website (see below). Maps are arranged with the most recent maps first.

Maps #27 and 28 (Submitted by Councilmember Kalb)

For the October 29, 2013 City Council hearing, Councilmember Kalb requested that NDC prepare two new maps (#27 and #28).

Councilmember Kalb's memo says: "I am submitting for Council consideration two additional maps that seek to keep neighborhoods together throughout our city. These two maps are variations of previous maps and include components that are contained within one or more of maps 18, 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25. These two maps (27 and 28) are identical to each other as to how they configure council districts one, two, three and seven. They differ from each other as to how they configure council districts four, five and six."

Click here to view Map #27 and Map #28 (with demographics tables)

Click here to view Maps #27 and Map #28 in Google Maps

Click here to view Councilmember Kalb's memo

Map #26 (Submitted by Councilmember McElhaney)

For the October 29, 2013 City Council hearing, Councilmember McElhaney requested that NDC prepare a new map (#26) which combines elements of maps previously discussed by Council: combines the D1/D2/D3 borders from Map 23 with the D4/D5/D6 borders from Map 24, with small adjustments to put Fruitvale Elementary School back in D4, and the cul-de-sacs off of Broadway Terrace back in D1. See the Councilmember's memo below for more details. Update: this map was selected by the Council on October 29, 2013 as the preferred 2013 Redistricting map. (See project schedule table for more details.)

Click here to view a presentation which shows the details of each neighborhood changed from the current district boundaries in Map #26.

Click here to view Map #26 (with demographics table)

Click here to view Map #26 in Google Maps

Click here to view Councilmember McElhaney's memo

Maps #18b and 21b --Revisions of Maps 18 and 21

For the October 29, 2013 City Council hearing, Councilmember Brooks requested that NDC prepare revised versions of Maps 18 and 21 which show minor changes to those two maps. For consistency, these two maps are given the numbers "18b" and "21b", instead of new numbers.

Click here to view Map 18b and Map 21b (with demographics table)

Click here to view Map 18b and Map 21b in Google Maps

Map #25 -- Revision of Map #22 (Submitted by the City's Redistricting consultant, NDC)

At the October 15, 2013 City Council hearing, a motion was adopted that Maps #18, 21 and 22 be forwarded for further consideration at the October 29, 2013 City Council hearing. The Council requested the consultant make specific alterations to these three maps; in addition to the necessary population balancing.

Details of Map #25 which were shown in Map #22, at the October 15 Council hearing:

  • Most of Adams Point moves from District 3 to District 2, divided along Bay Place, Montecito Ave, Lenox Ave, Van Buren Ave, Staten Ave, and Grand Ave
  • The Lakeshore area, east of Lake Merritt, stays in District 3.
  • District 1/District 2 border is unchanged from existing border.
  • District 1/District 3 border is changed: District 3 moves north to 40th west of Hwy 24; between Hwy 24 and Broadway, District 1 moves south to I-580, unifying Mosswood; District 3 stays north of I-580 to MacArthur east of Broadway, to keep Richmond Blvd neighborhood together.
  • District 1/District 4 border follows the 1993 Council map border, along Broadway Terrace to Skyline.
  • District 5 expands west into District 2, picking up the area between 23rd Ave and 21st Ave between 12th Street in the south, and 27th Street in the north.
  • Maxwell Park is united in District 4.
  • Fairfax/Melrose moves from District 4 to District 6
  • Trestle Glen Road is united in District 2
  • Fremont High stays in District 5
  • District 5 picks up the Melrose Elementary School attendance area south of International Blvd
  • In Fruitvale, Police Beat 24Y is united in District 4 and Beat 24X is united in District 5
  • District 4 expands the area it includes around Fruitvale Elementary to extend west from Champion St to Fruitvale Ave, and, south between Coolidge Ave and Peralta Creek south to Hyde St
  • No changes to current District 7 boundaries.

Mapping details which came as a result of public request: Glenwood Road unification in Glenview (from District 2 into District 5)

Click here to view Map #25 (with demographics table)

Click here to view Map #25 in Google Maps

Map #24 -- Revision of Map #21 (Submitted by the City's Redistricting consultant, NDC)

At the October 15, 2013 City Council hearing, a motion was adopted that Maps #18, 21 and 22 be forwarded for further consideration at the October 29, 2013 City Council hearing. The Council requested the consultant make specific alterations to these three maps; in addition to the necessary population balancing.

Details of Map #24 which were shown in Map #21, at the October 15 Council hearing:

  • APEN request for District 2 to move north of 14th Street, into downtown. Border of District 2 and 3 moves north to 19th St.
  • The Lakeshore Avenue area, east of Lake Merritt, stays in District 3
  • District 1/District 2 border is unchanged from existing border on Oakland Avenue.
  • District 1/District 3 border is changed: District 3 moves north to MacArthur, west of Highway 24; between Highway 24 and Broadway, District 1 moves south to I-580, unifying Mosswood; District 3 stays north of I-580 teacart east of Broadway to keep Richmond Blvd neighborhood together.
  • District 1/District 4 border follows the 1993 Council map border, along Broadway Terrace to Skyline Blvd.
  • Maxwell Park is united in District 4
  • Fairfax/Melrose moves from District 4 to District 6
  • Trestle Glen Road is united in District 2
  • Fremont High stays in District 5
  • District 5 picks up the Melrose Elementary School attendance area south of International Blvd
  • Fruitvale Elementary and the area immediately around it south of I-580 moves from District 4 to District 5
  • In Fruitvale, Police Beat 24Y is united in District 4 and Beat 24X is united in District 5
  • An area southeast of Fruitvale Elementary, between Coolidge and Peralta Creek north of Bona St, moves from District 5 to District 4 to balance populations
  • No changes to current District 7 boundaries

Details of Map #24 which were made at the request of Council on October 15:

  • Maxwell Park united in District 6
  • Fairfax/Melrose and adjoining area just south of Allendale back into District 4
  • Area south of Brookdale, west of 55th Avenue, and north of Bancroft into District 4, from District 6. This is part of Fairfax/Melrose, is more compact, and balances District 4 and District 6 total population
  • Peralta Hacienda Park and areas west of Peralta Creek, south of School Street back to District 5, from District 4

Mapping details which are a result of a public request:

  • Glenwood Road unification in Glenview (from District 2 into District 5)
  • Downtown, bring District 2 north from 19th Street to 20th Street, east of Broadway (a continuation of the APEN mapping proposal by one block)

Click here to view Map #24 (with demographics table)

Click here to view Map #24 in Google Maps

Map #23 -- Revision of Map #18 (Submitted by the City's Redistricting consultant, NDC)

At the October 15, 2013 City Council hearing, a motion was adopted that Maps #18, 21 and 22 be forwarded for further consideration at the October 29, 2013 City Council hearing. The Council requested the consultant make specific alterations to these three maps; in addition to the necessary population balancing.

Details of Map #23 which were shown in Map #18:

  • Trestle Glen Road is unified into District 2
  • Lakeshore Avenue and streets east of Lake Merritt moved from District 3 to District 2
  • Keeps District 1/District 3 border at its current location, along MacArthur Blvd
  • Fairfax/Melrose area moved to District 6
  • District 1/District 4 border changed to Broadway Terrace and Skyline Blvd

Details of Map #23 which were made at the request of Council at the October 15th hearing, or to balance population:

  • San Antonio neighborhood back into District 2, from District 5
  • Fremont High School back into District 5, from District 6
  • Bancroft/55th/International/51st "triangle" back into District 6 (from District 5)
  • Census blocks between Harrison St /Oakland Ave back into District 1, from District 2
  • Maxwell Park united in District 6 (moved from District 4 in Map #18)
  • Fruitvale Elementary neighborhood, from Sausal Creek down to Bona Street, and east to Coolidge, Peralta Hacienda Park, and area south of Allendale between Brookdale and Lyon Ave and Meadow St, to District 4
  • Between I-880 and International Blvd, from Seminary to 50th Avenue, move to District 5 from District 6
  • Between Bancroft and International, move from 51st Ave to 54th Ave from District 6 to District

Changes in Map #23 which are a result of a public request: Glenwood Road unification in Glenview (from District 2 into District 5).

Map #22 (Submitted by the City's Redistricting consultant, NDC)

This map was presented at the October 15, 2013 City Council hearing. It was forwarded to the October 29, 2013 Council hearing, for further public review and Council consideration. The primary change in this map is moving most of the Adams Point neighborhood into District 2. This map also unites Maxwell Park into District 4.

Map #21 (Submitted by City's Redistricting consultant, NDC)

This map was presented at the October 15, 2013 City Council hearing. It was forwarded to the October 29, 2013 Council hearing, for further public review and Council consideration. The primary change in this map is to include parts of downtown, from 14th Street to 19th Street, east of Broadway, into District 2.

Map #20 ("District 2 Communities of Interest")

The Asian Pacific Environmental Network submitted a map which makes changes to the District 2 and District 3 boundaries, in downtown Oakland. The map changes the boundary from 14th Street (current boundary) and extends it to 17th Street. The western boundary would continue to be Broadway, and the eastern boundary would be Lake Merritt.

Map Maker's comments: "This map addresses the imbalance between Districts 2 and 3 primarily by extending the boundaries of District 2 along the south end of Lake Merritt. This area is dense and contains many Asian Americans. However, the current boundary arbitrarily splits the community into two parts along 14th Street.

This map shifts the boundaries between Districts 2 and 3 to account for the growing Asian American community in the downtown, Lakeside, and East Lake areas.

1. This area is dense and reflects the existing character of Chinatown, with many renters and families, in medium-to large-sized apartment buildings.
2. Examining the area’s Census data shows that this area contains several very dense tracts with a high percentage of Asian citizens who are of voting age. This means every block matters in this area.
3. Data from our voter databases show that this area has a large number of Asian voters. In fact there are nearly as many Asian voters in this area as there are Asian voters above 580 in the current District 2 boundaries.
4. The existing boundary of 14th St is arbitrary. There are many Asian small businesses on either side of 14th St yet this area is split into two districts in some of the proposals.
5. In the work of my organization, Asian Pacific Environmental Network, we are finding that more of our Asian-American members are living in this area. Our members are highly reliant on public transit. This neighborhood is attractive because Chinatown is within walking distance from this neighborhood and there are many bus options that connect this community to the rest of Oakland.

Notably, this map does not include the parts of District 3 along the lake in China Hill as other maps have. I would argue that this area by the Lake is more similar to Grand Lake in both types of units (large apartment buildings), economic status (see rents posted on sites like Craigslist) than the rest of the area, and racial makeup (low % of communities of color). This map also adds parts of Trestle Glen currently in District 5, into District 2.

Overall, this map keeps together the dense Asian American communities in the downtown area in one district, and more clearly defines District 2’s flatlands areas as Chinatown and East Lake."

Map #19 (Maxwell Park neighbors)

At the October 3, 2013 Rules and Legislation Committee of the City Council, a representative from Maxwell Park presented a map.

Map maker's comments: "This redistricting proposal for unifying Maxwell Park into one district (District 6) was the collaboration of 15 residents from both Districts 4 and 6, with assistance from Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE). Our goal was to take into consideration the federal government requirements, the City Charter requiring redistricting every 10 years, the City Council's redistricting criteria, and how redistricting would impact our community in which we live.

The keys to our decision reflected our desire to have the following benefits:

• Unified Maxwell Park
• Reduction of crime -- collaboration with Neighborhood Crime Prevention Councils (NCPC)
• Improved public safety -- collaboration with business and OPD
• Improved commercial corridor development (the Laurel District, High Street, International Blvd, Foothill Blvd and Bancroft Avenue)
• Business and economic opportunity development (Coliseum)
• Improved education, health and welfare of District citizens (Eastmont Town Center and Mills College)

In parts of our 2013 proposed redistricting plan we extended our boundaries beyond the 2003 map, and change our boundaries into parts of District 5 and 6. That would result in an increase in population in District 6 by nearly 4,000 residents, and an increase above the Council District mean of 2,577 people, or 4.6%."

Map #18 (NDC Test A Adjusted) submitted by City's Redistricting Consultant, NDC

At the October 3, 2013 Rules and Legislation Committee of the City Council, the consultant produced a map, based on Map #17, which proposes the Maxwell Park neighborhood be combined into District 4; Map #18 proposes changes to Districts 5 and 6 which balance the population changes resulting from Maxwell Park being combined into District 4. Also, Map #18 shows Broadway Terrace as the boundary between Districts 1 and 4, which it was in 1993; and the map leaves the current border between Districts 1 & 3 the same as it is today: the Mosswood neighborhood remains in District 3. The Committee recommended that both maps #17 and 18 be the "focus" of discussion at the October 15th Council hearing.

Map # 17 (NDC Test A) submitted by City's Redistricting Consultant, NDC
Following the second round of meetings, NDC took the input of the community and developed the “NDC Test A” plan that attempts to put the many different comments and requests together into a plan that draws on the public input and balances the competing nature of some of the requests. The “NDC Test A” plan is one illustration of how the ‘puzzle pieces’ from the various plans can be put together in ways that achieve the goals or suggestions from residents of different parts of the community.

Oakland Votes Coalition maps from September 18, 2013 Redistricting workshop

Organizer's comments: "More than 70 Oakland residents came together on Sept. 18 at Impact Hub Oakland to share our love for Oakland and ideas about new district boundaries for the election of City Council and School Board representatives." Click here to read the summary of the workshops, and the map-maker's comments.

Map set 1: Citywide Redistricting proposals

Map set 2: District and Neighborhood proposals

Map #15

This map was submitted by a member of the public, after the Town Hall workshops in September.

Map maker's comments: “Plan attempts to keep communities of interest united within each district.
1. School district lines are used as guiding lines whenever possible
2. Organized communities are kept intact (e.g. Maxwell Park, Trestle Glen, Chinatown, etc).
3. Areas with similar residential and/or commercial assets are kept intact: family-scale residential areas around Lake Merritt; downtown high-rise developments; post-industrial neighborhoods on the Oakland shoreline; and the expansive flats of East Oakland."

Map #14 ("District 2 Proposed map")

This map was submitted by a member of the public after the Town Hall workshops in September. It proposes changes to District 2 boundaries. Map maker's comments:

"HISTORY: In 1993, Districts 2 and 5 were mapped to allow two emerging communities (i.e., the Asian and Latino communities) to gain meaningful access to the political process via the ballot box, along with African-American and White voters in the City of Oakland.

Working with the African-American and white communities, fragmented communities like the Asian and Latino communities were gathered together to form a re-districting map that allowed ALL communities to have equal representation. The current map of 2013 continues to reflect this effort, and we want to assure in the 2013 Redistricting process that the Asian and Latino communities retain their voting strength, and not be diluted, so as to make their votes ineffectual.

The District 2 map being proposed in 2013 preserves the integrity of the earlier re-districting processes, and keeps the Asian community from being diluted, while accounting for the required targeted number (55,818 people per district), based on the 2010 Census data.

HIGHLIGHTS & CHANGES
Here are some highlights and minor changes made to District 2 (note: 95% of District 2 remains the same):

1. Population is within 2% margin of target number.

2. Lakeside area next to Lake Merritt buttressing District 2 included in District 2 (previously "gerrymandered" into District 3).

3. Includes majority of Trestle Glen area by giving up the other side of Grand Ave (move back into District 3).

4. Leave 23rd Avenue side of District 2 as is, so as not to split up the Southeast Asian communities. They need to be kept with rest of Asian population.

5. Asians will retain their plurality with respect to both population and voting strength (slight dilution from adding Lakeside area).

6. While it was desirable to add the Jack London Square so District 2 were not isolated to the other side of railroad tracks, it was noted that there were too many residents in the Jack London area, and we could not exceed the target number per District, nor do so without diluting Asian population and voting bloc. The 5th Avenue/9th Avenue development corridor will have to suffice in order to bring the community from District 2 across the railroad tracks to water's edge.

OTHER DISTRICTS

1. District 5 has a couple of directions they can go (towards District 6 and District 4) without having to bifurcate the Southeast Asians, so we are requesting that District 5 not come into District 2 to get to the target number. Separating the Southeast Asians group from the primary Asian population in Chinatown, China Hill, and Eastlake dilutes Asian population and voting strength, and this is unacceptable.

2. District 3 and District 1 need to work with District 4 to get to the target number. District 2 is essentially where it needs to be to preserve the voting strength of the Asian community. District 3, 6 and 7 have strong African-American population and voting strength, and District 1 and 4 have strong white populations and voting strength. In order to assure Asians and Latinos each have a representative district, they should remain essentially the same during this Redistricting process with exception of some of the "edges" of their respective Districts.

FAIR AND EQUAL ACCESS BY ALL RESIDENTS
Fair and equal access to political landscape is a hard-fought right within the City of Oakland, and we do not want the Asian or Latino population and voting blocs diluted in any way; especially given the continual trend of refugees and immigrants making the City of Oakland their primary choice for settlement.

Respectfully submitted -- Shirley Gee, principal architect for Redistricting in 1993, 2003 on behalf of Asian-Americans community activists, and advocate since 1985. City of Oakland Resident since 1952."

Maps 11-13, Submitted by City's Redistricting Consultant, NDC. Comments: "These three plans are intended to generate discussion, and to supplement the public map submissions, not to replace or supersede them. When drawing these draft plans, NDC’s goal is to show options that are available to the Council. None of the draft plans is promoted as the “best” or “recommended” plan. Instead, each map attempts show different set of ways the Council could choose to address the various changes necessary to balance populations in each District, and to meet the requests of the public, in particular the public requests that were not already represented in maps submitted or requested by members of the public to date. None of the proposed maps make changes to the currently existing Districts 4, 6 or 7. See circles on maps where boundary changes are proposed."

Map #11 Map #11 Demographics table

Map #12 Map #12 Demographics table

Map #13 Map #13 Demographics table

Map #10 ("Socio-Economic map" adjustment, version 2)

Map maker's comments: "This takes the "Socio-Economic" (Plan 2) map, with the CM Kernighan fix, and rotates blocks around the Maxwell Park neighborhood to keep it cohesive. This meant shifting some from CD 5 into CD 6, then taking back from CD 7 into CD 5, to build back CD 5 to the correct population total; and taking some of CD 6 back into CD 7 along the south east corner."

Map #9 (Trestle Glen Road Neighbors)

This map proposes moving both sides of Trestle Glen Road into Council District 2, instead of the current boundary, between CD 2 and 5, which goes down the middle of Trestle Glen Road. This map was proposed by neighbors who live on this section of Trestle Glen Road.

Map #8 (“Fair Representation” or "Socio-Economic map variation")
Map maker's comments: "This map creates council districts that represent racial, ethnic and socioeconomic communities of interest, enhancing minority voting power in flatlands districts. D3 is more clearly defined as West Oakland and Jack London Square, with a portion of downtown, and D6 as the Southeast district. Both have African American pluralities. D5-Fruitvale retains a Latino plurality, and D7 Southwest goes from a Latino plurality to majority. D2-Downtown/Lake Merritt/San Antonio retains an Asian plurality. D4 becomes a hills-only district, from Highway 24 to Keller Ave, and includes Glenview and Crocker Highlands. D1 includes North Oakland, and the affluent Northeast Hills above Highway 24. District borders are easily recognizable borders and territories are compact. Minimal population deviation of 0.12%, or 66 persons from the ideal Council district average of 55,818 people. This map is a variation on the "Socio-Economic Plan" previously submitted. No incumbent City councilmembers would be displaced."

Map #7 ("Socio-Economic map adjusted for Maxwell Park")

Map maker's comments: "This plan takes the great ideas of the "Socio-Economic" maps, and adjusts Council districts 5 and 6, to not break up the very cohesive Maxwell Park neighborhood, and reshapes districts 6 and 7 to be more parallel again with a hills and flatlands combination. Both are preserved as strong black voting districts, but have slightly more cohesive alignments with community identity. Proposed as another way to consider how Council District 6 and 7 can exist."

Map #6 ("Hope 4 Oakland 2013 Redistricting Proposal")

Map maker's comments: “This redistricting proposal seeks to comply with all federal laws by creating districts as equal as possible in population and intentionally avoids gerrymandering based on race. It complies with Section 203 of the Oakland City Charter as it creates districts that are composed of contiguous territories that are as equal as possible in population and as geographically compact as practicable. No changes to the boundaries of any district in this plan would operate to exclude an incumbent City Councilperson before the term for which s he was elected. The primary focus of this plan is to re-unite neighborhoods and communities of interest that were divided during previous redistricting efforts. This plan as proposed would meet all of the criteria as adopted by the City Council on June 4 2013, with the exception of Criteria #7, with respect the School Board Member in District 5. This is mainly accomplished by smoothing the borders of adjoining districts by following key thoroughfares as they traverse the city.”

Map #5 (Submitted by Councilmember Brooks)

This map proposes alterations to the borders of Council Districts 1, 2, 3 and 5.

Map #4 ("Socio-Economic" 2)

Map maker's comments: "This plan is a modification of “Socio-Economic plan 1," putting Councilmember Kernighan’s home back into District 2."

Map #3 ("Socio-Economic" 1)

Map maker's comments: "This plan rearranges Council districts 1 & 3 and 6 & 7, to put similar socio-economic communities together, while not disturbing the racial-ethnic balance. A problem with this plan is the residences of Councilmembers Kernighan and Schaaf are both mapped in District 4."

Map #2 ("Cohesive Neighborhoods" 2)

Map maker's comments: "This plan keeps the total population deviation to 1.2%. It keeps neighborhoods intact, with easily recognizable boundaries; incumbents are not displaced; and it preserves the core of existing districts."

Map #1 ("Cohesive Neighborhoods" 1)
Map-maker’s comments: "This plan has its overarching objective to create districts that equalize population between districts to within a range of +/- 2.5% (that is, plus or minus 1,400 people of the 55,818 people who are the statistical mean of all Council districts) while retaining the core of the existing district boundaries. Further, insofar as practicable, to:

  • Keep existing neighborhoods communities of interest intact.
  • Use natural barriers or major transportation corridors as boundaries.
  • Include in each district a mix of residents of both flatlands and hills, i.e. areas east of I-580.
  • Continuity, integrity and compactness of territory in determining the specific shape of districts.
  • Keeps incumbent City Council or School Board members within the districts they currently represent."

Mapping Tools

As part of the City's redistricting process, the public was invited to draw their own proposed maps using Maptitude's online mapping software. This program required establishing an account and creating a login.

Since the adoption of the 2013-2023 map by City Council, this online mapping tool is no longer available.

All of the maps that were created by the public using this tool are linked to in the section above entitled Proposed Redistricting Maps.

Get Involved

For those who were unable to attend one of the public meetings or hearings, other engagement and feedback opportunities were available.

Redistricting Reference Materials

The following links to external websites with information and background on the redistricting process were provided as reference.

Click here to exit the City's website and see a Google map which compares the 2003 City Council boundaries with those from 1993. Click here to exit the City's website and create customized maps with one or more variables, overlaying US Census Bureau demographic and socioeconomic data (e.g., median household income, racial-ethnic composition, etc.) on Oakland census tracts. This online mapping software, "Info Alameda County," was created by the Urban Strategies Council, of Oakland, CA.

Brennan Center:

FAQ's from the California Citizens Redistricting Commission

Redistricting California, funding by the James Irvine Foundation: